Hamilton Fire Station townhouse plan draws fiery opposition ahead of Newcastle City Council date

Burning opposition to townhouse proposal for Hamilton Fire Station The existing Hamilton fire station building.
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HEATING UP: More than 90 submissions have opposed a revised plan for townhouses behind the former Hamilton Fire Station as depicted above.

HEATING UP: More than 90 submissions have opposed a revised plan for townhouses behind the former Hamilton Fire Station as depicted above.

HEATING UP: More than 90 submissions have opposed a revised plan for townhouses behind the former Hamilton Fire Station as depicted above.

HEATING UP: More than 90 submissions have opposed a revised plan for townhouses behind the former Hamilton Fire Station as depicted above.

HEATING UP: More than 90 submissions have opposed a revised plan for townhouses behind the former Hamilton Fire Station as depicted above.

HEATING UP: More than 90 submissions have opposed a revised plan for townhouses behind the former Hamilton Fire Station as depicted above.

HEATING UP: More than 90 submissions have opposed a revised plan for townhouses behind the former Hamilton Fire Station as depicted above.

TweetFacebook Take a look at the plansThe $1.6 milllion redevelopment of the historic former Hamilton Fire Station has met a blaze of opposition from neighbouring residents, with over 90 objections lodged to a townhouse proposal for the site.

Residents have warned the development is “not at all compatible” with the neighbourhoodand couldendanger children attending a nearby primary school.

But the developer, SNL Building Constructions, defended the planahead of a public voice meeting ofNewcastle City Council on Tuesday night. Approvals coordinator Wade Morris saidthe developmentcomplied with all of council’s planning controls for the area, which is zoned high-density residential.“It’s an area with pretty high amenity,” Mr Morrissaid. “We think it is able to support that built form and density.”

Under the plan, the existing circa-1925building at 9 Belford Street would be preserved and converted into a home.

Read more:

Historic Hamilton fire station up for saleFiries $1.9 million hot property sold offA further five three-storey townhouses wouldbe constructed behind iton the 900-square-metre block.

The townhouses would front Dixon Street, which also harbours Hamilton Public School and St Peter’s Anglican Church.

The updated proposal attracted 93 objections when the councilplaced it on public exhibition. An earlierversion of the plan, which included six townhouses, received 59 objections.

According to a council report, the objections centred on the “excessive” number of townhouses amounting to an overdevelopmentof the site, the “unsympathetic” height and design of the dwellings, heritage impacts, traffic and parking issues.

Five new driveways would be constructed alongDixon Street, and residents feared it would jeopordise the safety of pedestrians and school children on the “heavily trafficked” road.

A Dixon Street resident, Paul Shearston, was concerned about the removal ofon-street parking, which he said was already a major issueas a result of pressures from school parents, office workers catching the busand existing homes with no off-street parking.

He pointed out that council’s plans for the corridor stated that any new development should be compatible with existing buildings.

“Homes in Dixon Street are single-storey modest homes,” he said, adding that residents were not opposed to development on the site in general, but wanted a more appropriateproposal.

“There’s a concern about the heritage in the area,” he said. “Anumber of people see this area of Cameron’s Hill as having a unique status.”

Mr Shearston also rubbished suggestions the station’s hose-drying pole could be relocated to a nearby park as “laughable”.

Mr Morris pointed out the company had reduced the number of dwellings, and that Dixon Street was a low-speed environment.“The driveways are all designed to appropriate standards,” he said.

He also pointed out the development was in a designated growth corridor.“We’re very conscious of council’s planning controls and we’re just trying to deliver on that.”

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